Wythenshawe Memories – mapping a bygone time

Over this section of our mapping project, we aim to give just enough information to get people interested in finding out more for themselves and sharing what they are able to discover with us. 
The 8 challenges are set mostly for children, but they will need a fair amount of support from members of their families – you may find there are some things you already know as well as some new facts and some things that will spark an interest to learn more!😉😄


There are more challenges on our soundscape and video pages.  

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🍀 Good Luck 🍀

All your answers will help us build the different parts of our mapping project and we would love to hear from adults about their school memories too 🏫, even where you might have worked, once upon a time ago!  🏭

These challenges will help you to keep busy over the summer holidays and during Covid-19, especially on those wet and rainy days (that were and are still important to Manchester and Wythenshawe). We may well have some more for you by October half-term and Christmas! 😂😂😂

DID YOU KNOW? Wythenshawe was once countryside with a few farms. We can date parts of the area to before the Domesday Book which was printed in 1086, after the Battle of Hastings in 1066, the new king from France, wanted to know what he now owned!

Some of Wythenshawe’s place names are based on language from before this!

CHALLENGE 1 – Can you find out where the name Wythenshawe comes from and any other old names for the areas? Baguley, Benchill, Brooklands, Peel Hall, Newall Green, Woodhouse Park, Moss Nook, Northern Moor, Northenden, Sharston and Royal Oak, all have their own history!
HINT – try Google and Wikipedia.

CHALLENGE 2 – Where does the language used originate? England was invaded by many other cultures which left traces in our language. Is it Roman? Viking? Celtic? French? – let us know what you find out 😄

Map of the area from 1897
Map of the area from 1897
Haveley Hey Farm 1906 cutting corn.
Haveley Hey Farm 1906 cutting corn.

There was a different kind of estate owned by the likes of lords and ladies before there were the estates we have come to know and love.

CHALLENGE 3 – Who were the Tatton’s and are they the only “heritage” family associated with Wythenshawe? HINT – use https://www.realliveswythenshawe.com/heritage or Wythenshawe History Group on Facebook.
– don’t forget to tell us what you discovered.

Our estates were born out of the need for housing following World War 1, supported by the Addison Act.

This Housing Act enabled local authorities to build social housing, and along with subsequent Acts, informed policy for the housing sector nationwide.

For the 100th anniversary of the Addison Act, An exhibition was launched at Archives+, Manchester Central Library on 19 December 2019. With newly digitised interviews from the Manchester Studies oral history collection document the impact on people moving out of Manchester city centre.

Tatton Family outside Bramhall Hall, 1928. Manchester Local Image Collection ref: m734369
Tatton Family outside Bramhall Hall, 1928. Manchester Local Image Collection ref: m734369

Openstreetmap.org has a “Detailed Old Victorian Ordnance Survey 6 inch to 1 mile Old Map (1888-1913) of M229ZJ / M22 9ZJ / M229ZJ, United Kingdom. Map Centre Decimal Latitude/Longitude (WGS84): 53.383907, -2.252203” – with a slider that overlaps the exact location of streets and buildings. We believe this is as accurate as we can locate as of June 2020.

In 1920, town planner Patrick Abercrombie identified the area as the most suitable undeveloped land for a housing estate close to Manchester city centre, as it was then, overcrowded, bombed, and unhygienic. He believed he could plan a “garden city“.

CHALLENGE 4 – Who was Patrick Abercrombie?

CHALLENGE 5 – Why was Manchester a busy place to live? HINT – what can you find out about the cottage industries and the industrial revolution? Even the Irish potato famine brought people to our area of a once rural country.

CHALLENGE 6 – Why might Manchester have been overcrowded and unhygienic? HINT – Where did we get our drinking water from? How many people used to live in one house or even one room? Were they all of the same family? Where did our household waste go? and where did our toilet waste go? 😖 Was this a sustainable way to live?

CHALLENGE 7 – What is a garden city and why might the people of Manchester have needed one? 🌿
Why should we care about our green spaces?

 
Please let us know what you were able to find out. 😄

Wythenshawe Estate Plan, M14/1/22 Papers of Lady Shena Simon of Wythenshawe (1883-1972); Manchester Libraries, Archives and Information
Wythenshawe Estate Plan, M14/1/22 Papers of Lady Shena Simon of Wythenshawe (1883-1972); Manchester Libraries, Archives and Information
Floats Hall Farm 1949 - taken from Wythenshawe History Group's photo archives
Floats Hall Farm 1949 – taken from Wythenshawe History Group’s photo archives
conditions-and-reactions-of-industrial-revolution-35-638

Part of Benchill (not the area southwest of Gladeside Road) and some areas in the north were built before World War II and called the Wythenshawe Ward of the City of Manchester. The rest was built after the Second World War, starting in the late 1940s as wartime building restrictions were relaxed. Parts of Baguley were still semi-rural in the 1960s, but now there is very little open country left.

Haveley Road in the making 🏗, Benchill 1949 - taken from Wythenshawe History Group's photo archives
Haveley Road in the making 🏗, Benchill 1949 – taken from Wythenshawe History Group’s photo archives

However maps tell just one side of the history of Wythenshawe, they usually represent an ariel view of the placement of the building and green spaces.

What about its people, how do we find out about them?
We can use photos, stories (oral history) and video.

Listen to an oral history memory

Mrs. G. registered for housing after she was married (1103/61)

CHALLENGE 8 – Why not “interview” your parents or grandparents, perhaps even a great grandparent, how they come to live in Wythenshawe? What’s your family’s history?
Where did they go to school, when were they allowed to live education?

Where did they play as a child, what games did the play and with who? Where did they buy their sweets? What were the sweets like, and what did they cost?


You could record it and send it to us, marked “oral history”.

There are more challenges on our soundscape and video pages.

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Page layout designed M. Comar; our affiliated Digital Grounds Keeper.

Digital business page @ wythenshawewastewarriors.co.uk/wp/m-comar

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